The Wetland Park

As promised, Ry and I returned to the Wetland Park on our next day off.

We had an MTR station-inspired lunch of beef curry, scallops and a chocolate pastry.

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After lunch, we made our way over.

Located in the Northern part of Tin Shui Wai, the site of the Wetland Park was originally intended to be a conservation area to compensate for the wetlands lost due to the development of the Tin Shui Wai New Town. It was decided that a Wetland Park would fulfil the function of conservation, as well as being a world-class ecotourism facility to serve both local residents and overseas tourists.

The mission of the Hong Kong Wetland Park is to foster public awareness, knowledge and understanding of the value of wetlands through the Eat Asian region and beyond, highlighting the need to conserve them.

Before entering, we were greeted by an eco-maze and some wetland animal statues…

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Upon entering, we saw a beautiful tank of coral fish and these adorable old men taking photos of what was essentially Nemo and the gang!

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Moving on, you’ll see many insect displays, such as caterpillars, which I think are one of the creepiest insects around.

Everything about them from the way that they look to the way that they move freaks me out, big time.

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In the next room, there were many beautiful models of the vast variety of life within and affected by wetlands.

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Next up were dark areas filled with crocodiles, frogs and horseshoe crabs, among many others!

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I generally find frogs terrifying, but these ones were on another level.

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After walking around in the dark for a while, I was happy to see McDull and his pals in the Human Culture section.

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Finally we made our way outside, as I was surprised how much of the Wetland Park was indoor based.

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This is Pui Pui, a saltwater crocodile who had become a local celebrity in Hong Kong since being spotted in the Shan Pui River in Yuen Long.

After months of unsuccessful attempts by Chinese experts and weeks by Australian crocodile hunter John Lever, the reptile was caught by Hong Kong’s Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department (AFCD) in 2004.

The crocodile saga aroused wide public interest in wetland and wildlife conservation in Hong Kong.

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The contrast between the nature and high-rise buildings looks pretty spectacular, don’t you think?

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We also found a little hut where you could do a spot of bird watching.

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There were loads of mud skippers lying around.

What a polite crab 😉

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I’ve never seen/heard of a leaf-eating crab before!

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THERE’S A CROC IN THE RIVER! 

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Ryan really enjoyed his day at the Wetland Park, describing it as the most approachable green place that he’s come across in Hong Kong. “There’s great detail paid to each area that the park has to offer; from the indoor education zones and bird spotting stands to the floating pontoons and mangroves.”

I thought that the Wetland Park offered a scenic and relaxing place to walk around. I especially liked spotting the little crabs scuttling around!

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At $30 a pop, it’s well worth a trip! To find out more, check them out here.

xxx

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