Lamma Island

Fancying a more chilled out day after our trip to Mong Kok, Ryan and I decided to pay our first visit to Lamma Island. This is the third largest island in Hong Kong, located to the Southwest of Hong Kong Island.

Despite being the most populated area on Lamma Island, the population only reaches around 6000.

With a reputation for alternative, laid back lifestyles; it is popular with expatriates, younger generations, artists and musicians.

We decided to visit the Northern Village called Yung Shue Wan, as we heard that there’s more to see there; as opposed to the Eastern village (Sok Kwu Wan), which mainly consists of seafood restaurants.

After a 30 minute ferry ride from Central, we arrived to be greeted by colourful flags fluttering in the wind.

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Having once been a fishing village, the harbour was lined with seafood restaurants.

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The blend of Western and Chinese island life is also evident through the numerous pubs and multicultural restaurants you see upon arrival.

You also get a tight-knit community feel through seeing  homemade posters and the locals who seemed to know everyone that they passed.

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Buildings higher than three storeys are prohibited on the island; therefore the buildings have quite a Western vibe to them.

However Ryan thought that a lot of the areas looked like unfinished building jobs with unkept gardens.

The island also has no cars, besides those for the emergency services and for transporting construction materials. The communitys’ only transport means is by foot or bicycle, similar to Cheung Chau Island.

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The main street is lined with shops selling handicrafts from Southeast Asia, quirky boutiques as well as a mixture of Eastern and Western eateries.

We even found a charity shop, which is a first in Hong Kong!

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After walking through the town, we took a scenic stroll over to Hung Shing Yeh Beach.

However some of the scenery was somewhat ruined by the constant sight of power-plants and the smell of sewage.

Ryan described it as an unhealthy feeling mix of rural and industrial.

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Upon arrival, we saw a beautiful restaurant adorned with fairy lights.

However the beach paled in comparison, mainly due to the fact that it overlooked a power plant :/

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After taking in the views, I decided to try a frozen pineapple from a seaside shop.

Turns out they’re essentially flavourless and make your tongue feel really weird :/

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We also came across this beast on our way back…

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…along with a spot of graffiti and a sticker that I’ve seen around Hong Kong before.

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By the time we made it back to the centre, the sun was beginning to set. So we walked along the harbour…

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…and visited the Tin Hau Temple.

These are typical places of worship in Hong Kong’s coastal communities because Tin Hau is believed to be the goddess of the sea, thus protecting fishermen and ensuring full nets.

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We had a final stroll around the shops before dinner.

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After checking out the menus of most of the restaurants, we settled for Thai food in a cosy little restaurant.

Ry had a spicy pork fried rice which was tasty, but the portion size and pork was slightly lacking.

I had a seafood green curry, which contained lots of vegetables and was flavoured well. However it was still a tad too spicy for me despite having asked for it to be cooked mild.

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Finally we ended the night with a lemon cheesecake from Shelly Cake Express, who serve homemade cakes, cookies and hot drinks!

We’ll definitely be back 😉

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Despite not being the most scenic or best smelling island, Lamma Island is definitely still worth a visit as there’s so many worthwhile small businesses to support. The shops are unique and there is an abundance of multicultural restaurants to try out! 😀

xxx

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