Peng Chau

With the aim of visiting all of Hong Kong’s outlying islands, we finally got round to paying a visit to Peng Chau, a small island located off the North-Eastern coast of Lantau Island.

We were prepared and even checked the timetable before we left the house this time 😉

The half an hour journey on the rocky little ferry made me feel a little worse for wear…

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We’ve arrived! 😀

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Of all the island destinations in Hong Kong, Peng Chau rarely finds itself on the tourist agenda, therefore its streets are devoid of crowds, noise and pollution, which is rather relaxing.

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We came across a French-owned bar and café with a lovely outdoor area on the island’s main square.

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There were also lots of cats and dogs roaming around!

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Our first stop was the Tin Hau Temple.These are typical places of worship in Hong Kong’s coastal communities because Tin Hau is believed to be the goddess of the sea, thus protecting fishermen and ensuring full nets.

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Our next journey took us down the narrow alleyways that mainly sold fresh food, with a few derelict sites and building work in progress/had been forgotten about.

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Although it’s more of a rural retreat today, it was once a thriving industrial island.

While fishing and farming was the obvious source of island income, Peng Chau was also the centre of Hong Kong’s lime and matchstick production in the 1970s-80s. The remnants of the old lime kiln and Great China Match Plant from the 1930’s remains.

Unfortunately we didn’t do the Peng Chau Heritage Trail, so we have no photos to show you from that!

However we did take a walk along the waterfront…

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…passing typical low-rise island accommodation, dried fish and interesting decorations.

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There were even rows of comfy office chairs overlooking the sea…beats a wooden bench I guess!

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Like Lamma Island, we felt that maybe the locals were a bit too relaxed and the island could have done with a little TLC.

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A couple of snaps by the sea…

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…before heading back into the main square, which appeared to be populated by the elderly.

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A typical sight of old men crowding around a game of checkers.

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We ventured around the island a little more and found a little shrine.

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All that walking called for a sit down and a bit of nosh!

We passed many reasonably priced eateries, but settled for Vietnamese food in this little place…

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Ry went for pork neck on cold moan noodles, which he appreciated as it was something that he’d never tried before, but was quite indifferent to the taste.

I’m personally not a fan of cold noodles :/

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I went for the Sharing Platter (which I shared with Ry…kinda!)

This consisted of spring rolls, chicken wings, minced meat on prawn crackers, pork neck and I have no idea what that semi circular grey stuff was. We think it was some kind of sausage?!

My favourites were the cold chickens’ feet in the middle, which were perfectly balanced in the spice and sour department!

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Peng Chau is known for its small island lifestyle, accessibility to fresh seafood and several temples located around the island. These include the Tin Hau Temple, Golden Flower Shrine, Lung Mo Temple and the Seven Sisters Temple.

As we already had dinner plans, we ditched the seafood and walked along the small beach and checked out the temples instead.

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Ry and I managed to walk around the whole island in a few hours as it measures less than a square kilometer.

However there are a few hiking trails; the tallest point of the island is Finger Hill which is 95m in height and offers a panoramic view of the city to the East and Disneyland to the West.

Though, as you may be able to tell by our later photos, it wasn’t the warmest of days or the clearest of skies, so we decided to give it a miss and hopped back on the ferry to meet Rico and Mike for dinner in Central!

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For a city that’s smaller than London, HK has one hell of a lot of diversity!

So if you guys are in the area and fancy a chilled out rural retreat with a dash of history and culture; get yourselves down to Central Pier 4. The journey takes half an hour, with ferries running at 40-50 minutes intervals. Remember to check the timetable before you go!

Or if you just fancy a bit of designer shopping, surrounded by the beautiful businessmen and women of Central, check out our previous post on Expat HQ 😉

xxx

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3 thoughts on “Peng Chau

  1. Well now you know where to go when you want away from the madding crowd. As I scrolled down the photos. I thought Ry by the look on your face you were standing in the sea, but no just a Ry effect face. You will be planning your New Year celebrations now. Don’t forget the cleaning. J.

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